Classic Books For Teens of All Time

Below are the 49 classic books for teens of all time. Click Read Review to read book reviews on Amazon. Click Google Preview to read chapters from Google Books if available. Click Find in Library to check book availability at your local library. If the default library is not correct, follow Change Library to reset it.

1. The Catcher in the Rye

by: Jerome Salinger
Release date: Feb 15, 2016
Number of Pages: 182
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“The Catcher in the Rye” (in other translations – “Break on the edge of rye fields of childhood,” “Catcher in the grain field,” English The Catcher in the Rye -. The Catcher in the Rye,” 1951) – a novel by American writer Jerome Salinger. In it on behalf of the 16-year old boy named Holden in a very blatant form it tells about his heightened perception of American reality and the rejection of the common canons and morality of modern society. The work was immensely popular among young people and among the adult population, have a significant impact on world culture of the second half of the XX century. The novel was translated almost all world languages. In 2005, Time magazine included the novel in the list of the 100 best English-language novels written since 1923, and publisher Modern Library [en] included in its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. However, despite this, at the same time in the US the novel has often been criticized, and the prohibition of the large amount of obscene language.

2. To Kill a Mockingbird

by: Harper Lee
Release date: Jul 08, 2014
Number of Pages: 336
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Voted America’s Best-Loved Novel in PBS’s The Great American Read Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning masterwork of honor and injustice in the deep South—and the heroism of one man in the face of blind and violent hatred One of the most cherished stories of all time, To Kill a Mockingbird has been translated into more than forty languages, sold more than forty million copies worldwide, served as the basis for an enormously popular motion picture, and was voted one of the best novels of the twentieth century by librarians across the country. A gripping, heart-wrenching, and wholly remarkable tale of coming-of-age in a South poisoned by virulent prejudice, it views a world of great beauty and savage inequities through the eyes of a young girl, as her father—a crusading local lawyer—risks everything to defend a black man unjustly accused of a terrible crime.

3. Lord of the Flies

by: William Golding
Release date: Mar 15, 2012
Number of Pages: 176
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William Golding’s Lord of the Flies is a dystopian classic: ‘exciting, relevant and thought-provoking’ (Stephen King). When a group of schoolboys are stranded on a desert island, what could go wrong? ‘One of my favorite books – I read it every couple of years.’ (Suzanne Collins, author of The Hunger Games) A plane crashes on a desert island. The only survivors are a group of schoolboys. By day, they discover fantastic wildlife and dazzling beaches, learning to survive; at night, they are haunted by nightmares of a primitive beast. Orphaned by society, it isn’t long before their innocent childhood games devolve into a savage, murderous hunt … ‘Stands out mightily in my memory … Such a strong statement about the human heart.’ (Patricia Cornwell) ‘Terrifying and haunting.’ (Kingsley Amis) ‘Beautifully written, tragic and provocative.’ (E. M. Forster) ONE OF THE BBC’S ICONIC ‘NOVELS THAT SHAPED OUR WORLD’ What readers are saying: ‘Every real human being should read this … This is what we are.’ ‘It’s brilliant, it’s captivating, it’s thought provoking and brutal and for some, its truly terrifying.’ ‘It can be read and re-read many times, and every time something new will appear.’ ‘There is a reason why this is studied at school … Excellent read.’ ‘This is one of the few books I’ve read that I keep on my Kindle to read again.’ ‘I revisit this every few years and it’s always fresh and impressive … One of the best books I’ve ever read.’

5. The Diary of a Young Girl

by: Anne Frank
Release date: Jan 01, 1998
Number of Pages: 426
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This abridged version of Anne Frank’s Diary has been taken from the definitive edition which restores substantial material ommitted from the original edition. Anne Frank emerges as more human and more spirited than ever before.

6. The Hobbit

by: J.R.R. Tolkien
Release date: Feb 15, 2012
Number of Pages: 288
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A great modern classic and the prelude to The Lord of the Rings. Bilbo Baggins is a hobbit who enjoys a comfortable, unambitious life, rarely traveling any farther than his pantry or cellar. But his contentment is disturbed when the wizard Gandalf and a company of dwarves arrive on his doorstep one day to whisk him away on an adventure. They have launched a plot to raid the treasure hoard guarded by Smaug the Magnificent, a large and very dangerous dragon. Bilbo reluctantly joins their quest, unaware that on his journey to the Lonely Mountain he will encounter both a magic ring and a frightening creature known as Gollum. “A glorious account of a magnificent adventure, filled with suspense and seasoned with a quiet humor that is irresistible . . . All those, young or old, who love a fine adventurous tale, beautifully told, will take The Hobbit to their hearts.” – New York Times Book Review

7. The Giver

by: Lois Lowry
Release date: Jul 01, 2014
Number of Pages: 240
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Living in a “perfect” world without social ills, a boy approaches the time when he will receive a life assignment from the Elders, but his selection leads him to a mysterious man known as the Giver, who reveals the dark secrets behind the utopian facade.

8. A Wrinkle in Time

by: Madeleine L’Engle
Release date: Apr 01, 2010
Number of Pages: 216
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Madeleine L’Engle’s ground-breaking science fiction and fantasy classic, now a major motion picture. It was a dark and stormy night; Meg Murry, her small brother Charles Wallace, and her mother had come down to the kitchen for a midnight snack when they were upset by the arrival of a most disturbing stranger. “Wild nights are my glory,” the unearthly stranger told them. “I just got caught in a downdraft and blown off course. Let me sit down for a moment, and then I’ll be on my way. Speaking of ways, by the way, there is such a thing as a tesseract.” A tesseract (in case the reader doesn’t know) is a wrinkle in time. To tell more would rob the reader of the enjoyment of Miss L’Engle’s unusual book. A Wrinkle in Time, winner of the Newbery Medal in 1963, is the story of the adventures in space and time of Meg, Charles Wallace, and Calvin O’Keefe (athlete, student, and one of the most popular boys in high school). They are in search of Meg’s father, a scientist who disappeared while engaged in secret work for the government on the tesseract problem. A Wrinkle in Time is the winner of the 1963 Newbery Medal. It is the first book in The Time Quintet, which consists of A Wrinkle in Time, A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet, Many Waters, and An Acceptable Time. A Wrinkle in Time is now a movie from Disney, directed by Ava DuVernay, starring Storm Reid, Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon and Mindy Kaling. This title has Common Core connections. Books by Madeleine L’Engle A Wrinkle in Time Quintet A Wrinkle in Time A Wind in the Door A Swiftly Tilting Planet Many Waters An Acceptable Time A Wrinkle in Time: The Graphic Novel by Madeleine L’Engle; adapted & illustrated by Hope Larson Intergalactic P.S. 3 by Madeleine L’Engle; illustrated by Hope Larson: A standalone story set in the world of A Wrinkle in Time. The Austin Family Chronicles Meet the Austins (Volume 1) The Moon by Night (Volume 2) The Young Unicorns (Volume 3) A Ring of Endless Light (Volume 4) A Newbery Honor book! Troubling a Star (Volume 5) The Polly O’Keefe books The Arm of the Starfish Dragons in the Waters A House Like a Lotus And Both Were Young Camilla The Joys of Love

10. Anne of Green Gables, Complete 8-Book Box Set

by: L. M. Montgomery
Release date: Sep 01, 1990
Number of Pages: 497
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Here is a deluxe gift-box edition of L.M. Montgomery’s classic stories about one of the most beloved fictional heroines of all time–Anne of Green Gables.

11. The Book Thief

by: Markus Zusak
Release date: Jan 01, 2013
Number of Pages: 552
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Trying to make sense of the horrors of World War II, Death relates the story of Liesel–a young German girl whose book-stealing and story-telling talents help sustain her family and the Jewish man they are hiding, as well as their neighbors.

12. The Hate U Give

by: Angie Thomas
Release date: Aug 01, 2018
Number of Pages: 437
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Read the book that inspired the movie! Sixteen-year-old Starr lives in two worlds: the poor neighbourhood where she was born and raised and her posh high school in the suburbs. The uneasy balance between them is shattered when Starr is the only witness to the fatal shooting of her unarmed best friend, Khalil, by a police officer. Now what Starr says could destroy her community. It could also get her killed. Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, this is a powerful and gripping novel about one girl’s struggle for justice.

13. Speak

by: Laurie Halse Anderson
Release date: May 10, 2011
Number of Pages: 208
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The first ten lies they tell you in high school. “Speak up for yourself–we want to know what you have to say.” From the first moment of her freshman year at Merryweather High, Melinda knows this is a big fat lie, part of the nonsense of high school. She is friendless, outcast, because she busted an end-of-summer party by calling the cops, so now nobody will talk to her, let alone listen to her. As time passes, she becomes increasingly isolated and practically stops talking altogether. Only her art class offers any solace, and it is through her work on an art project that she is finally able to face what really happened at that terrible party: she was raped by an upperclassman, a guy who still attends Merryweather and is still a threat to her. Her healing process has just begun when she has another violent encounter with him. But this time Melinda fights back, refuses to be silent, and thereby achieves a measure of vindication. In Laurie Halse Anderson’s powerful novel, an utterly believable heroine with a bitterly ironic voice delivers a blow to the hypocritical world of high school. She speaks for many a disenfranchised teenager while demonstrating the importance of speaking up for oneself. Speak was a 1999 National Book Award Finalist for Young People’s Literature.

14. Pride and Prejudice

by: Jane Austen
Release date: Jan 01, 1995
Number of Pages: 262
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In early nineteenth-century England, a spirited young woman copes with the suit of a snobbish gentleman, as well as the romantic entanglements of her four sisters.

15. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

by: Mark Twain
Release date: May 26, 1994
Number of Pages: 220
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Referring to “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, ” H. L. Mencken noted that his discovery of this classic American novel was “the most stupendous event of my whole life”; Ernest Hemingway declared that “all modern American literature stems from this one book,” while T. S. Eliot called Huck “one of the permanent symbolic figures of fiction, not unworthy to take a place with Ulysses, Faust, Don Quixote, Don Juan, Hamlet.” The novel’s preeminence derives from its wonderfully imaginative re-creation of boyhood adventures along the mighty Mississippi River, its inspired characterization, the author’s remarkable ear for dialogue, and the book’s understated development of serious underlying themes: “natural” man versus “civilized” society, the evils of slavery, the innate value and dignity of human beings, the stultifying effects of convention, and other topics. But most of all, “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” is a wonderful story filled with high adventure and unforgettable characters (including the great river itself) that no one who has read it will ever forget. Unabridged Dover (1994) republication of the text of the first American edition, published by Charles L. Webster and Company, New York, 1885. New introductory Note.”

16. Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

by: Ransom Riggs
Release date: Jun 07, 2011
Number of Pages: 352
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Read the #1 New York Times best-selling series before it continues in A Map of Days. Bonus features • Q&A with author Ransom Riggs • Eight pages of color stills from the film • Sneak preview of Hollow City, the next novel in the series A mysterious island. An abandoned orphanage. A strange collection of very curious photographs. It all waits to be discovered in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, an unforgettable novel that mixes fiction and photography in a thrilling reading experience. As our story opens, a horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow—impossible though it seems—they may still be alive. A spine-tingling fantasy illustrated with haunting vintage photography, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children will delight adults, teens, and anyone who relishes an adventure in the shadows. “A tense, moving, and wondrously strange first novel. The photographs and text work together brilliantly to create an unforgettable story.”—John Green, New York Times best-selling author of The Fault in Our Stars “With its X-Men: First Class-meets-time-travel story line, David Lynchian imagery, and rich, eerie detail, it’s no wonder Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children has been snapped up by Twentieth Century Fox. B+”—Entertainment Weekly “‘Peculiar’ doesn’t even begin to cover it. Riggs’ chilling, wondrous novel is already headed to the movies.”—People “You’ll love it if you want a good thriller for the summer. It’s a mystery, and you’ll race to solve it before Jacob figures it out for himself.”—Seventeen

17. The Fault in Our Stars

by: John Green
Release date: Jan 01, 2012
Number of Pages: 318
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Despite the medical miracle that has bought her a few more years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, but when Augustus Waters suddenly appears at the Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be rewritten.

19. Tuck Everlasting

by: Natalie Babbitt
Release date: Jan 20, 2015
Number of Pages: 144
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Critically acclaimed when it was first published, Tuck Everlasting has become a much-loved, well-studied modern-day classic. This anniversary edition features an in-depth interview conducted by Betsy Hearne in which Natalie Babbitt takes a look at Tuck Everlasting twenty-five years later. What if you could live forever? Is eternal life a blessing or a curse? That is what young Winnie Foster must decide when she discovers a spring on her family’s property whose waters grant immortality. Members of the Tuck family, having drunk from the spring, tell Winnie of their experiences watching life go by and never growing older. But then Winnie must decide whether or not to keep the Tucks’ secret—and whether or not to join them on their never-ending journey. Praise for Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt: “A fearsome and beautifully written book that can’t be put down or forgotten.” —The New York Times “Exciting and excellently written.” —The New York Times Book Review “With its serious intentions and light touch the story is, like the Tucks, timeless.” —Chicago Sun-Times “Probably the best work of our best children’s novelist.” —Harper’s “Natalie Babbitt’s great skill is spinning fantasy with the lilt and sense of timeless wisdom of the old fairy tales. . . . It lingers on, haunting your waking hours, making you ponder.” —The Boston Globe “This book is as shapely, crisp, sweet, and tangy as a summer-ripe pear.” —Entertainment Weekly This title has Common Core connections.

20. The Princess Bride

by: William Goldman
Release date: Oct 08, 2007
Number of Pages: 480
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William Goldman’s modern fantasy classic is a simple, exceptional story about quests—for riches, revenge, power, and, of course, true love—that’s thrilling and timeless. Anyone who lived through the 1980s may find it impossible—inconceivable, even—to equate The Princess Bride with anything other than the sweet, celluloid romance of Westley and Buttercup, but the film is only a fraction of the ingenious storytelling you’ll find in these pages. Rich in character and satire, the novel is set in 1941 and framed cleverly as an “abridged” retelling of a centuries-old tale set in the fabled country of Florin that’s home to “Beasts of all natures and descriptions. Pain. Death. Brave men. Coward men. Strongest men. Chases. Escapes. Lies. Truths. Passions.”

21. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

by: Sherman Alexie
Release date: Jan 10, 2012
Number of Pages: 272
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Bestselling author Sherman Alexie tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot. Heartbreaking, funny, and beautifully written, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, which is based on the author’s own experiences, coupled with poignant drawings by Ellen Forney that reflect the character’s art, chronicles the contemporary adolescence of one Native American boy as he attempts to break away from the life he was destined to live. With a forward by Markus Zusak, interviews with Sherman Alexie and Ellen Forney, and four-color interior art throughout, this edition is perfect for fans and collectors alike.

22. Hatchet

by: Gary Paulsen
Release date: Aug 25, 2009
Number of Pages: 192
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Celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of the Newbery Honor–winning survival novel Hatchet with a pocket-sized edition perfect for travelers to take along on their own adventures. This special anniversary edition includes a new introduction and commentary by author Gary Paulsen, pen-and-ink illustrations by Drew Willis, and a water resistant cover. Hatchet has also been nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read. Thirteen-year-old Brian Robeson, haunted by his secret knowledge of his mother’s infidelity, is traveling by single-engine plane to visit his father for the first time since the divorce. When the plane crashes, killing the pilot, the sole survivor is Brian. He is alone in the Canadian wilderness with nothing but his clothing, a tattered windbreaker, and the hatchet his mother had given him as a present. At first consumed by despair and self-pity, Brian slowly learns survival skills—how to make a shelter for himself, how to hunt and fish and forage for food, how to make a fire—and even finds the courage to start over from scratch when a tornado ravages his campsite. When Brian is finally rescued after fifty-four days in the wild, he emerges from his ordeal with new patience and maturity, and a greater understanding of himself and his parents.

23. The Call of the Wild

by: Jack London
Release date: Mar 15, 2015
Number of Pages: 117
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The Call of the Wild is a novel by Jack London, originally published in 1903. The story is set in the Yukon during the 1890s Klondike Gold Rush—a period when strong sled dogs were in high demand. The novel’s central character is a dog named Buck, a domesticated dog living at a ranch in the Santa Clara Valley of California as the story opens. Stolen from his home and sold into service as sled dog in Alaska, he reverts to a wild state. Buck is forced to fight in order to dominate other dogs in a harsh climate. Eventually he sheds the veneer of civilization, relying on primordial instincts and learned experience to emerge as a leader in the wild. This book is considered an American classic and is required reading in many schools. Xist Publishing is a digital-first publisher. Xist Publishing creates books for the touchscreen generation and is dedicated to helping everyone develop a lifetime love of reading, no matter what form it takes

24. The Perks of Being a Wallflower

by: Stephen Chbosky
Release date: Jan 01, 2012
Number of Pages: 231
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Charlie is a freshman. And while he’s not the biggest geek in the school, he is by no means popular. Shy, introspective, intelligent beyond his years yet socially awkward, he is a wallflower, caught between trying to live his life and trying to run from it. Charlie is attempting to navigate his way through uncharted territory: the world of first dates and mix-tapes, family dramas and new friends; the world of sex, drugs, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show, when all one requires is that perfect song on that perfect drive to feel infinite. But Charlie can’t stay on the sideline forever. Standing on the fringes of life offers a unique perspective. But there comes a time to see what it looks like from the dance floor. The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a deeply affecting coming-of-age story that will spirit you back to those wild and poignant roller-coaster days known as growing up. The Perks of Being a Wallflower film will be released in cinemas 3rd October 2012.

25. The Lord of the Rings and Philosophy

by: Gregory BasshamEric Bronson
Release date: Nov 13, 2013
Number of Pages: 336
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The Lord of the Rings is intended to be applicable to the real world of relationships, religion, pleasure, pain, and politics. Tolkien himself said that his grand tale of wizards, orcs, hobbits, and elves was aimed at truth and good morals in the actual world. Analysis of the popular appeal of The Lord of the Rings (on websites and elsewhere) shows that Tolkien fans are hungry for discussion of the urgent moral and cosmological issues arising out of this fantastic epic story. Can political power be wielded for good, or must it always corrupt? Does technology destroy the truly human? Is it morally wrong to give up hope? Can we find meaning in chance events? In The Lord of the Rings and Philosophy, seventeen young philosophy professors, all of them ardent Tolkien fans and most of them contributors to the four earlier volumes in the Popular Culture and Philosophy series, address some of these important issues and show how clues to their solutions may be found in the imaginary world of Middle-earth. The book is divided into five sections, concerned with Power and the Ring, the Quest for Happiness, Good and Evil in Middle-earth, Time and Mortality, and the Relevance

26. The Hunger Games

by: Suzanne Collins
Release date: Feb 01, 2012
Number of Pages: 374
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The original New York Times best-selling novel is now presented with new movie artwork from the major motion picture on the cover.

27. Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret.

by: Judy Blume
Release date: Apr 29, 2014
Number of Pages: 192
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Faced with the difficulties of growing up and choosing a religion, a twelve-year-old girl talks over her problems with her own private God.

28. Nineteen Eighty-Four

by: George Orwell
Release date: Jan 28, 2021
Number of Pages: 304
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Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949) was George Orwell’s final novel and was completed in difficult conditions shortly before his early death. It is one of the most influential and widely-read novels of the post-war period.

29. The Adventures Of Tom Sawyer

by: Mark Twain
Number of Pages: 240
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A graveyard rendezvous becomes a test of bravery for two adventurous youths who witness a murder along the banks of the Mississippi

30. The House on Mango Street

by: Sandra Cisneros
Release date: Apr 30, 2013
Number of Pages: 144
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The bestselling coming-of-age classic, acclaimed by critics, beloved by readers of all ages, taught in schools and universities alike, and translated around the world—from the winner of the 2019 PEN/Nabokov Award for Achievement in International Literature. The House on Mango Street is the remarkable story of Esperanza Cordero, a young Latina girl growing up in Chicago, inventing for herself who and what she will become. Told in a series of vignettes-sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes deeply joyous-Sandra Cisneros’ masterpiece is a classic story of childhood and self-discovery. Few other books in our time have touched so many readers.

31. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

by: Betty Smith
Release date: Nov 10, 2009
Number of Pages: 493
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32. The Great Gatsby

by: F. Scott Fitzgerald
Release date: Apr 27, 2021
Number of Pages: 134
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The Great Gatsby (1925) is a novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Published at the height of Fitzgerald’s career as a leading writer of American fiction, The Great Gatsby was reviewed poorly by contemporary critics, but has since been recognized as a groundbreaking work for its vision of American decadence and decay. Adapted into several influential films and adored by generations of readers and writers, The Great Gatsby is not only Fitzgerald’s crowning achievement, but one of the finest novels ever written. Nick Carraway is a young veteran and Yale graduate who moves to New York in search of work. He rents a bungalow on Long Island next door to the extravagant mansion of Jay Gatsby, a magnanimous millionaire with a mysterious past. There, he reconnects with his distant cousin Daisy and her husband Tom Buchanan, a flagrant philanderer who brings Nick to the city in order to spend time with Myrtle, his impoverished mistress. Soon, he receives an invitation to a party at the Gatsby mansion, where he gets terribly drunk and meets his neighbor, who swears they served together in the Great War. As time goes by, the two begin a tenuous friendship bolstered by stories of the war and a mutual fondness for alcohol. When Nick discovers that Gatsby and Daisy have a complicated history with one another, he starts to question not only the nature of his neighbor’s kindness, but his own desire to make it big in New York. The Great Gatsby is a tragic tale of ambition and romance set in the Roaring Twenties, a decade born from war and lost to economic disaster. With a beautifully designed cover and professionally typeset manuscript, this new edition of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is a classic work of American literature reimagined for modern readers.

33. The Time Machine Illustrated

by: H G Wells
Release date: May 03, 2021
Number of Pages: 104
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The Time Machine is a science fiction short story by H. G. Wells, published in 1895 and written as a landmark story. The work is generally credited with popularizing the concept of time travel using a vehicle or device to consciously and selectively travel forward or backward through time.

34. Romeo and Juliet

by: William Shakespeare
Release date: Nov 01, 2014
Number of Pages: 288
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Presents the original text of Shakespeare’s play side by side with a modern version, discusses the author and the theater of his time, and provides quizzes and other study activities.

35. The Astonishing Color of After

by: Emily X.R. Pan
Release date: Mar 20, 2018
Number of Pages: 480
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A stunning, heartbreaking debut novel about grief, love, and family, perfect for fans of Jandy Nelson and Celeste Ng. Leigh Chen Sanders is absolutely certain about one thing: When her mother died by suicide, she turned into a bird. Leigh, who is half Asian and half white, travels to Taiwan to meet her maternal grandparents for the first time. There, she is determined to find her mother, the bird. In her search, she winds up chasing after ghosts, uncovering family secrets, and forging a new relationship with her grandparents. And as she grieves, she must try to reconcile the fact that on the same day she kissed her best friend and longtime secret crush, Axel, her mother was taking her own life. Alternating between real and magic, past and present, friendship and romance, hope and despair, The Astonishing Color of After is a stunning and heartbreaking novel about finding oneself through family history, art, grief, and love. “Emily X.R. Pan’s brilliantly crafted, harrowing first novel portrays the vast spectrum of love and grief with heart-wrenching beauty and candor. This is a very special book.”–John Green, bestselling author of The Fault in Our Stars and Turtles All the Way Down

36. Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging

by: Louise Rennison
Release date: Aug 13, 2013
Number of Pages: 272
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Angus: My mixed-breed cat, half domestic tabby, half Scottish wildcat. The size of a small Labrador, only mad. Thongs: Stupid underwear. What’s the point of them, anyway? They just go up your bum, as far as I can tell. Full-Frontal Snogging: Kissing with all the trimmings, lip to lip, open mouth, tongues … everything. Her dad’s got the mentality of a Teletubby (only not so developed). Her cat, Angus, is trying to eat the poodle next door. And her best friend thinks she looks like an alien — just because she accidentally shaved off her eyebrows. Ergghhhlack. Still, add a little boy-stalking, teacher-baiting, and full-frontal snogging with a Sex God, and Georgia’s year just might turn out to be the most fabbitty fab fab ever!

37. Animal Farm

by: George Orwell
Release date: Aug 31, 2021
Number of Pages: 78
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Animal Farm is a satirical allegorical novella by George Orwell, first published in England on 17 August 1945. The book tells the story of a group of farm animals who rebel against their human farmer, hoping to create a society where the animals can be equal, free, and happy. Ultimately, the rebellion is betrayed, and the farm ends up in a state as bad as it was before, under the dictatorship of a pig named Napoleon. According to Orwell, the fable reflects events leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1917 and then on into the Stalinist era of the Soviet Union. Orwell, a democratic socialist, was a critic of Joseph Stalin and hostile to Moscow-directed Stalinism, an attitude that was critically shaped by his experiences during the May Days conflicts between the POUM and Stalinist forces during the Spanish Civil War. The Soviet Union had become a totalitarian autocracy built upon a cult of personality while engaging in the practice of mass incarcerations and secret summary trials and executions. In a letter to Yvonne Davet, Orwell described Animal Farm as a satirical tale against Stalin (“un conte satirique contre Staline”), and in his essay “Why I Write” (1946), wrote that Animal Farm was the first book in which he tried, with full consciousness of what he was doing, “to fuse political purpose and artistic purpose into one whole”. The original title was Animal Farm: A Fairy Story, but U.S. publishers dropped the subtitle when it was published in 1946, and only one of the translations during Orwell’s lifetime kept it. Other titular variations include subtitles like “A Satire” and “A Contemporary Satire”. Orwell suggested the title Union des républiques socialistes animales for the French translation, which abbreviates to URSA, the Latin word for “bear”, a symbol of Russia. It also played on the French name of the Soviet Union, Union des républiques socialistes soviétiques.

38. I’ll Give You the Sun

by: Jandy Nelson
Release date: Sep 16, 2014
Number of Pages: 384
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The New York Times Bestselling story of first love, family, loss, and betrayal for fans of John Green, Nicola Yoon, Jonathan Tropper, Emma Straub, and Rainbow Rowell “We were all heading for each other on a collision course, no matter what. Maybe some people are just meant to be in the same story.” At first, Jude and her twin brother are NoahandJude; inseparable. Noah draws constantly and is falling in love with the charismatic boy next door, while daredevil Jude wears red-red lipstick, cliff-dives, and does all the talking for both of them. Years later, they are barely speaking. Something has happened to change the twins in different yet equally devastating ways . . . but then Jude meets an intriguing, irresistible boy and a mysterious new mentor. The early years are Noah’s to tell; the later years are Jude’s. But they each have only half the story, and if they can only find their way back to one another, they’ll have a chance to remake their world. This radiant, award-winning novel from the acclaimed author of The Sky Is Everywhere will leave you breathless and teary and laughing—often all at once. Printz Award Winner Stonewall Honor Book “A wild, beautiful, and profoundly moving novel. Jandy Nelson’s writing is so electric, so alive, her pages practically glow in the dark.” —Ransom Riggs, New York Times bestselling author of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children and Hollow City “Jandy Nelson is a rare, explosive talent, and one of the best writers working today. Her prose is vivid, breathtaking, and drenched in passion, and her stories remind me why words can change the world.” —Tahereh Mafi, New York Times bestselling author of the Shatter Me series. “I love this book. Jandy Nelson is my new writing hero. Read this book. She’ll be your favorite author as well.” —Holly Goldberg Sloan, New York Times bestselling author of Counting by 7s “Jandy Nelson’s writing is poetic and mesmerizing. More importantly, Nelson weaves a novel that seeps into your bones like fire on a cold day . . . I’ll Give You the Sun is a novel that promises a story like nothing else and then delivers it.” —Garret Freymann-Weyr, author of Printz Honor book, My Heartbeat “This is a stunning, artfully woven story. My heart burst open at the blazing, unforgettable end. Magnificent.” —Nova Ren Suma, author of Imaginary Girls and 17 & Gone “An extraordinary book! I’ve never read anything like it. Lyrical-unique-passionate-magical-tragic-hopeful—Nelson’s characters will fly off the page and into your heart.” —Nancy Garden, author of Annie on my Mind

39. I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter

by: Erika L. Sanchez
Release date: Mar 05, 2019
Number of Pages: 368
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National Book Award Finalist! Instant New York Times Bestseller! The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian meets Jane the Virgin in this poignant but often laugh-out-loud funny contemporary YA about losing a sister and finding yourself amid the pressures, expectations, and stereotypes of growing up in a Mexican American home. Perfect Mexican daughters do not go away to college. And they do not move out of their parents’ house after high school graduation. Perfect Mexican daughters never abandon their family. But Julia is not your perfect Mexican daughter. That was Olga’s role. Then a tragic accident on the busiest street in Chicago leaves Olga dead and Julia left behind to reassemble the shattered pieces of her family. And no one seems to acknowledge that Julia is broken, too. Instead, her mother seems to channel her grief into pointing out every possible way Julia has failed. But it’s not long before Julia discovers that Olga might not have been as perfect as everyone thought. With the help of her best friend, Lorena, and her first love (first everything), Connor, Julia is determined to find out. Was Olga really what she seemed? Or was there more to her sister’s story? And either way, how can Julia even attempt to live up to a seemingly impossible ideal?

40. A Separate Peace

by: John Knowles
Release date: Dec 01, 1984
Number of Pages: 192
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John Knowles’ beloved classic has been a bestseller for more than 30 years and is one of the most moving and accurate novels about the trials and confusions of adolescence ever written. Set at an elite boarding school for boys during World War II, A Separate Peace is the story of friendship and treachery, and how a tragic accident involving two young men forever tarnishes their innocence.

41. Frankenstein

by: Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
Release date: Nov 29, 2014
Number of Pages: 148
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• This book publication is unique which includes exclusive Introduction, Historical Background and handcrafted additional content. • This edition also includes detailed Biography. • This edition has been corrected for spelling and grammatical errors.Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, is a novel written by English author Mary Shelley about eccentric scientist Victor Frankenstein, who creates a grotesque creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment. Shelley started writing the story when she was eighteen, and the novel was published when she was twenty. The first edition was published anonymously in London in 1818. Shelley’s name appears on the second edition, published in France in 1823.Shelley had travelled through Europe in 1814, journeying along the river Rhine in Germany with a stop in Gernsheim which is just 17 km (10 mi) away from Frankenstein Castle, where two centuries before an alchemist was engaged in experiments. Later, she traveled in the region of Geneva (Switzerland)—where much of the story takes place—and the topics of galvanism and other similar occult ideas were themes of conversation among her companions, particularly her lover and future husband, Percy Shelley. Mary, Percy, Lord Byron, and John Polidori decided to have a competition to see who could write the best horror story. After thinking for days, Shelley dreamt about a scientist who created life and was horrified by what he had made; her dream later evolved into the story within the novel.Frankenstein is infused with elements of the Gothic novel and the Romantic movement and is also considered to be one of the earliest examples of science fiction. Brian Aldiss has argued that it should be considered the first true science fiction story, because unlike in previous stories with fantastical elements resembling those of later science fiction, the central character “makes a deliberate decision” and “turns to modern experiments in the laboratory” to achieve fantastic results. It has had a considerable influence across literature and popular culture and spawned a complete genre of horror stories, films, and plays.Since publication of the novel, the name “Frankenstein” is often used to refer to the monster itself, as is done in the stage adaptation by Peggy Webling. This usage is sometimes considered erroneous, but usage commentators regard the monster sense of “Frankenstein” as well-established and an acceptable usage. In the novel, the monster is identified via words such as “creature”, “monster”, “fiend”, “wretch”, “vile insect”, “daemon”, “being”, and “it”. Speaking to Victor Frankenstein, the monster refers to himself as “the Adam of your labours”, and elsewhere as someone who “would have” been “your Adam”, but is instead “your fallen angel.”

42. The Little Prince

by: Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Release date: Jan 01, 2005
Number of Pages: 83
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An aviator whose plane is forced down in the Sahara Desert encounters a little prince from a small planet who relates his adventures in seeking the secret of what is important in life.

43. The Lightning Thief Songbook

by:
Release date: Oct 01, 2018
Number of Pages: 104
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(Vocal Selections). A dozen vocal selections are included in this songbook featuring music and lyrics by Rob Rokicki for his off-Broadway musical adapted from the 2005 fantasy-adventure novel of the same name. Includes: Bring on the Monsters * D.O.A. * Drive * Good Kid * Killer Quest! * Lost! * My Grand Plan * Prologue/The Day I Got Expelled * Put You in Your Place * Son of Poseidon * Strong * The Tree on the Hill.

44. Treasure Island

by: Robert Louis Stevenson
Release date: May 03, 2016
Number of Pages: 240
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For sheer storytelling delight and pure adventure, Treasure Island has never been surpassed. From young Jim Hawkins’s first encounter with the sinister beggar Pew to the climactic battle with the most memorable villain in literature, Long John Silver, this novel has fired readers’ imaginations for generations. A rousing tale of treachery, greed and daring, Treasure Island continues to enthrall readers of all ages.

45. Wuthering Heights

by: Emily Brontë
Release date: Jan 01, 2008
Number of Pages: 330
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This new edition of Emily Bronte’s classic 1847 novel uses the authoritative Clarendon text. Patsy Stoneman’s introduction considers the bewildering variety of critical interpretation to which the novel has been subject, as well as offering some provocative new insights for the modernreader.

46. Looking for Alaska

by: John Green
Release date: Jan 01, 2005
Number of Pages: 232
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Sixteen-year-old Miles’ first year at Culver Creek Preparatory School in Alabama includes good friends and great pranks, but is defined by the search for answers about life and death after a fatal car crash. An ALA Best Book for Young Adults & ALA Quick Pick. Reprint.

47. Assassin’s Creed Odyssey

by: Gordon DohertyOliver Bowden
Release date: Nov 01, 2018
Number of Pages: 368
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Get ready for Odyssey: journey deeper in the world of Assassin’s Creed in the official novel of the highly anticipated new game, coming October 2018. Greece, 5th century BCE. Kassandra is a mercenary of Spartan blood, sentenced to death by her family, cast out into exile. Now she will embark on an epic journey to become a legendary hero – and uncover the truth about her mysterious lineage. The Assassin’s Creed novels have sold more than 1 million copies around the world, gaining almost 30,000 4 and 5 star reviews. See what readers are already saying about the series that lets you dive deeper into the world behind the highly acclaimed video game series: ‘A brilliant read’ ***** ‘I love this book’ ***** ‘Original and unique’ ***** ‘A brilliant accompaniment to the games’ *****

48. Holes

by: Louis Sachar
Release date: Jun 01, 2011
Number of Pages: 272
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Winner of the Newbery Medal and the National Book Award! This #1 New York Times bestselling, modern classic in which boys are forced to dig holes day in and day out is now available with a splashy new look. Stanley Yelnats is under a curse. A curse that began with his no-good-dirty-rotten-pig-stealing-great-great-grandfather and has since followed generations of Yelnatses. Now Stanley has been unjustly sent to a boys’ detention center, Camp Green Lake, where the boys build character by spending all day, every day digging holes exactly five feet wide and five feet deep. There is no lake at Camp Green Lake. But there are an awful lot of holes. It doesn’t take long for Stanley to realize there’s more than character improvement going on at Camp Green Lake. The boys are digging holes because the warden is looking for something. But what could be buried under a dried-up lake? Stanley tries to dig up the truth in this inventive and darkly humorous tale of crime and punishment—and redemption. Includes a double bonus: an excerpt from Small Steps, the follow-up to Holes, as well as an excerpt from Louis Sachar’s new middle-grade novel, Fuzzy Mud. “A smart jigsaw puzzle of a novel.” –The New York Times WINNER OF THE BOSTON GLOBE-HORN BOOK AWARD A NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW NOTABLE CHILDREN’S BOOK SELECTED FOR NUMEROUS BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR AND ALA HONORS

49. Their Eyes Were Watching God

by: Zora Neale Hurston
Release date: May 30, 2020
Number of Pages: 192
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Their Eyes Were Watching God is a 1937 novel by African-American writer Zora Neale Hurston. It is considered a classic of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, and it is likely Hurston’s best known work.

Last updated on October 16, 2021