The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

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The Handmaid’s Tale

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 2016
Number of Pages: 512
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‘It isn’t running away they’re afraid of. We wouldn’t get far. It’s those other escapes, the ones you can open in yourself, given a cutting edge’ Offred is a Handmaid. She has only one function: to breed. If she refuses to play her part she will, like all dissenters, be hanged at the wall or sent out to die slowly of radiation sickness. She may walk daily to the market and utter demure words to other Handmaid’s, but her role is fixed, her freedom a forgotten concept. Offred remembers her old life – love, family, a job, access to the news. It has all been taken away. But even a repressive state cannot obliterate desire. Includes exclusive content: In The ‘Backstory’ you can read Margaret Atwood’s account of how she came to write this landmark dystopian novel ‘Compulsively readable’ Daily Telegraph

More books by Margaret Atwood

1. Old Babes in the Wood

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Mar 07, 2023
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A dazzling collection of fifteen short stories from Margaret Atwood, the internationally acclaimed, award-winning author of The Handmaid’s Tale and The Testaments. Margaret Atwood has established herself as one of the most visionary and canonical authors in the world. This collection of fifteen extraordinary stories–some of which have appeared in The New Yorker and The New York Times Magazine–explore the full warp and weft of experience, speaking to our unique times with Atwood’s characteristic insight, wit and intellect. The two intrepid sisters of the title story grapple with loss and memory on a perfect summer evening; “Impatient Griselda” explores alienation and miscommunication with a fresh twist on a folkloric classic; and “My Evil Mother” touches on the fantastical, examining a mother-daughter relationship in which the mother purports to be a witch. At the heart of the collection are seven extraordinary stories that follow a married couple across the decades, the moments big and small that make up a long life of uncommon love–and what comes after. Returning to short fiction for the first time since her 2014 collection Stone Mattress, Atwood showcases both her creativity and her humanity in these remarkable tales which by turns delight, illuminate, and quietly devastate.

2. Fourteen Days

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Sep 13, 2022
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3. Dearly

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Mar 17, 2022
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‘A source of uncompromising elemental warmth’ Ali Smith By turns moving, playful and wise, the poems gathered in Dearly are about absences and endings, ageing and retrospection, but also about gifts and renewals. They explore bodies and minds in flux, as well as the everyday objects and rituals that embed us in the present. Werewolves, sirens and dreams make their appearance, as do various forms of animal life and fragments of our damaged environment. Dearly is a pure Atwood delight, and long-term readers and new fans alike will treasure its insight, empathy and humour. BOOK OF THE YEAR OBSERVER, FINANCIAL TIMES

4. Burning Questions

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Mar 01, 2022
Number of Pages: 496
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** A 2022 Book to Look Forward To in The Times, i, Financial Times, Guardian, Evening Standard, New Statesman, Cosmopolitan and SheerLuxe ** From cultural icon Margaret Atwood comes a brilliant collection of essays — funny, erudite, endlessly curious, uncannily prescient — which seek answers to Burning Questions such as: Why do people everywhere, in all cultures, tell stories? How much of yourself can you give away without evaporating? How can we live on our planet? Is it true? And is it fair? What do zombies have to do with authoritarianism? In over fifty pieces Atwood aims her prodigious intellect and impish humour at our world, and reports back to us on what she finds. The roller-coaster period covered in the collection brought an end to the end of history, a financial crash, the rise of Trump and a pandemic. From debt to tech, the climate crisis to freedom; from when to dispense advice to the young (answer: only when asked) to how to define granola, we have no better questioner of the many and varied mysteries of our human universe. ‘Brilliant and funny’ Joan Didion ‘She’s taken our times and made us wise to them’ Ali Smith ‘Lights a fire from the fears of our age . . . Miraculously balances humor, outrage, and beauty’ New York Times Book Review ‘All over the reading world, the history books are being opened to the next blank page and Atwood’s name is written at the top of it’ Anne Enright, Guardian ‘The outstanding novelist of our age’ Sunday Times

5. Cutting Edge

by: Margaret AtwoodAimee BenderEdwidge DanticatValerie MartinBernice L. McFadden
Release date: Nov 05, 2019
Number of Pages: 222
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A chilling noir collection featuring fifteen crime and mystery tales and six poems from female authors. Joyce Carol Oates, a queen-pin of the noir genre, has brought her keen and discerning eye to the curation of an outstanding anthology of brand-new top-shelf short stories (and poems by Margaret Atwood!). While bad men are not always the victims in these tales, they get their due often enough to satisfy readers who are sick and tired of the gendered status quo, or who just want to have a little bit of fun at the expense of a crumbling patriarchal society. This stylistically diverse collection will make you squirm in your seat, stay up at night, laugh out loud, and inevitably wish for more. With stories by: Joyce Carol Oates, Margaret Atwood (poems), Valerie Martin, Aimee Bender, Edwidge Danticat, Sheila Kohler, S.A. Solomon, S.J. Rozan, Lucy Taylor, Cassandra Khaw, Bernice L. McFadden, Jennifer Morales, Elizabeth McCracken, Livia Llewellyn, Lisa Lim, and Steph Cha. Praise for Cutting Edge “The indefatigable Joyce Carol Oates gathers a strong list of names . . . . Emerging and established authors provide attention-grabbing short works: especially notable are Edwidge Danticat’s story on the quotidian horror of domestic violence, Bernice L. McFadden’s comic take on the appropriation of racial friendship, and Lisa Lim’s illustrations of a grotesque marriage.” —Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine “But of course, in the end, it isn’t the themes or the innovations on the format of the short story anthology that make the tales collected in Cutting Edge most “feel” as if you were reading Joyce Carol Oates herself. It is the writing. The tight plots and fresh, flowing prose that go about their business until—snap!—the story’s well-oiled mousetrap does its job.” —New York Journal of Books “The 15 stories and six poems in this slim yet weighty all-original noir anthology . . . are razor-sharp and relentless in their portrayal of life, offering snapshots of dysfunction, everyday toil, and brief joy. It is unusual, however, in its scope, zeroing in not only on what the female characters endure but what they dish out . . . . Each story sears but does not cauterize, leaving protagonists and readers raw . . . . Fans of contemporary crime fiction won’t want to miss this one.” —Publishers Weekly

6. The Testaments

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Sep 10, 2019
Number of Pages: 432
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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • WINNER OF THE BOOKER PRIZE • A modern masterpiece that “reminds us of the power of truth in the face of evil” (People)—and can be read on its own or as a sequel to Margaret Atwood’s classic, The Handmaid’s Tale. “Atwood’s powers are on full display” (Los Angeles Times) in this deeply compelling Booker Prize-winning novel, now updated with additional content that explores the historical sources, ideas, and material that inspired Atwood. More than fifteen years after the events of The Handmaid’s Tale, the theocratic regime of the Republic of Gilead maintains its grip on power, but there are signs it is beginning to rot from within. At this crucial moment, the lives of three radically different women converge, with potentially explosive results. Two have grown up as part of the first generation to come of age in the new order. The testimonies of these two young women are joined by a third: Aunt Lydia. Her complex past and uncertain future unfold in surprising and pivotal ways. With The Testaments, Margaret Atwood opens up the innermost workings of Gilead, as each woman is forced to come to terms with who she is, and how far she will go for what she believes.

7. War Bears

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Apr 09, 2019
Number of Pages: 104
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From the Booker Prize-winning author of The Handmaid’s Tale, comes this historical fiction graphic novel tracing the Golden Age of Canadian comic books. Collects War Bears issues #1-3. Oursonette, a fictional Nazi-fighting superheroine, is created at the peak of World War II by comic book creator Al Zurakowski who dreams of making it big in the early world of comics publishing. A story that follows the early days of comics in Toronto, a brutal war that greatly strains Al personally and professionally, and how the rise of post-war American comics puts an end to his dreams. Internationally and New York Times best-selling novelist Margaret Atwood and acclaimed artist Ken Steacy collaborate for one of the most highly anticipated comic book and literary events!

8. The Complete Angel Catbird

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Oct 16, 2018
Number of Pages: 313
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From the Booker Prize-winning author of The Handmaid’s Tale, comes the complete collection of the #1 New York Times bestselling graphic novel from Margaret Atwood! Internationally best-selling and respected novelist Margaret Atwood and acclaimed artist Johnnie Christmas collaborate for one of the most highly anticipated comic book and literary events! A genetic engineer caught in the middle of a chemical accident all of a sudden finds himself with superhuman abilities. With these new powers he takes on the identity of Angel Catbird and gets caught in the middle of a war between animal/human hybrids. What follows is a humorous, action-driven, educational, and pulp- inspired superhero adventure–with a lot of cat puns. Includes previously unpublished art by Margaret Atwood. Collects Angel Catbird volumes 1-3

9. The Bad News

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Oct 02, 2018
Number of Pages: 10
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“We don’t like bad news, but we need it. We need to know about it in case it’s coming our way.” This delicious, contemptuous and poignant micro-story is the first in the acclaimed collection, Moral Disorder, from towering author and #1 New York Times Bestseller, Margaret Atwood. The bad news arrives in the form of a paper, which Tig carries up the stairs to Nell who is wallowing in bed. A year from now, they won’t remember the details, but for now, the bad news sits between the aging couple as they prepare their breakfast together and Nell imagines them in Southern France as the barbarians invade Rome on what is beautiful day, safe and quiet, for now, from the bad news coming their way. A Vintage Shorts Selection. An ebook short.

10. Freedom

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Apr 05, 2018
Number of Pages: 144
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Can we ever be wholly free? In this book of breathtaking imaginary leaps that conjure dystopias and magical islands, Margaret Atwood holds a mirror up to our own world. The reflection we are faced with, of men and women in prisons literal and metaphorical, is frightening, but it is also a call to arms to speak and to act to preserve our freedom while we still can. And in that, there is hope. Selected from The Handmaid’s Tale and Hag-Seed by Margaret Atwood. VINTAGE MINIS: GREAT MINDS. BIG IDEAS. LITTLE BOOKS. A series of short books by the world’s greatest writers on the experiences that make us human

11. The Secret Loves of Geeks

by: Margaret AtwoodGerard WayDana SimpsonPatrick Rothfuss
Release date: Feb 13, 2018
Number of Pages: 136
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Following the smash-hit The Secret Loves of Geek Girls comes this brand new anthology featuring comic and prose stories from cartoonists and professional geeks about their most intimate, heartbreaking, and inspiring tales of love, sex and, dating. Including creators of all genders, orientations, and cultural backgrounds. Featuring work by MARGARET ATWOOD (The Handmaid’s Tale), GERARD WAY (Umbrella Academy), PATRICK ROTHFUSS (The Name of the Wind), DANA SIMPSON (Phoebe and Her Unicorn), GABBY RIVERA (America), HOPE LARSON, (Batgirl), CECIL CASTELLUCCI (Soupy Leaves Home), VALENTINE DE LANDRO (Bitch Planet), MARLEY ZARCONE (Shade), SFÉ R. MONSTER (Beyond: A queer comics anthology), AMY CHU (Wonder Woman), a cover by BECKY CLOONAN (Demo) and many more.

12. The Burgess Shale

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Mar 17, 2017
Number of Pages: 88
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“The outburst of cultural energy that took place in the 1960s was in part a product of the two decades that came before. It’s always difficult for young people to see their own time in perspective: when you’re in your teens, a decade earlier feels like ancient history and the present moment seems normal: what exists now is surely what has always existed.” Margaret Atwood compares the Canadian literary landscape of the 1960s to the Burgess Shale, a geological formation that contains the fossils of many strange prehistoric life forms. The Burgess Shale is not entirely about writing itself, however: Atwood also provides some insight into the meagre writing infrastructure of that time, taking a lighthearted look at the early days of the institutions we take for granted today—from writers’ organizations, prizes, and grant programs to book tours and festivals.

13. A Trio of Tolerable Tales

by: Margaret AtwoodDušan Petričić
Release date: Mar 01, 2017
Number of Pages: 52
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Three hilarious Margaret Atwood tales, together in a chapter book for the first time! In Rude Ramsay and the Roaring Radishes, Ramsay runs away from his revolting relatives and makes a new friend with more refined tastes. The second tale, Bashful Bob and Doleful Dorinda, features Bob, who was raised by dogs, and Dorinda, who does housework for relatives who don’t like her. It is only when they become friends that they realize they can change their lives for the better. And finally, to get her parents back, Wenda and her woodchuck companion have to outsmart Widow Wallop in Wandering Wenda and Widow Wallop’s Wunderground Washery. Young readers will become lifelong fans of Margaret Atwood’s work and the kind of wordplay that makes these tales such rich fare, whether they are read aloud or enjoyed independently. Reminiscent of Carl Sandburg’s Rootabaga Stories, these compelling tales are a lively introduction to alliteration. Key Text Features illustrations humour Correlates to the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.7 Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem).

14. The Secret Loves of Geek Girls: Expanded Edition

by: Margaret AtwoodVarious
Release date: Oct 18, 2016
Number of Pages: 256
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The Secret Loves of Geek Girls is a non-fiction anthology mixing prose, comics, and illustrated stories on the lives and loves of an amazing cast of female creators. Featuring work by Margaret Atwood (The Heart Goes Last), Mariko Tamaki (This One Summer), Trina Robbins (Wonder Woman), Marguerite Bennett (Marvel’s A-Force), Noelle Stevenson (Nimona), Marjorie Liu (Monstress), Carla Speed McNeil (Finder), and over fifty more creators. It’s a compilation of tales told from both sides of the tables: from the fans who love video games, comics, and sci-fi to those that work behind the scenes: creators and industry insiders.

15. Hag-Seed

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Oct 11, 2016
Number of Pages: 320
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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • The beloved author of The Handmaid’s Tale reimagines Shakespeare’s final, great play, The Tempest, in a gripping and emotionally rich novel of passion and revenge. “A marvel of gorgeous yet economical prose, in the service of a story that’s utterly heartbreaking yet pierced by humor, with a plot that retains considerable subtlety even as the original’s back story falls neatly into place.”—The New York Times Book Review Felix is at the top of his game as artistic director of the Makeshiweg Theatre Festival. Now he’s staging aTempest like no other: not only will it boost his reputation, but it will also heal emotional wounds. Or that was the plan. Instead, after an act of unforeseen treachery, Felix is living in exile in a backwoods hovel, haunted by memories of his beloved lost daughter, Miranda. And also brewing revenge, which, after twelve years, arrives in the shape of a theatre course at a nearby prison. Margaret Atwood’s novel take on Shakespeare’s play of enchantment, retribution, and second chances leads us on an interactive, illusion-ridden journey filled with new surprises and wonders of its own. Praise for Hag-Seed “What makes the book thrilling, and hugely pleasurable, is how closely Atwood hews to Shakespeare even as she casts her own potent charms, rap-composition included. . . . Part Shakespeare, part Atwood, Hag-Seed is a most delicate monster—and that’s ‘delicate’ in the 17th-century sense. It’s delightful.”—Boston Globe “Atwood has designed an ingenious doubling of the plot of The Tempest: Felix, the usurped director, finds himself cast by circumstances as a real-life version of Prospero, the usurped Duke. If you know the play well, these echoes grow stronger when Felix decides to exact his revenge by conjuring up a new version of The Tempest designed to overwhelm his enemies.”—Washington Post “A funny and heartwarming tale of revenge and redemption . . . Hag-Seed is a remarkable contribution to the canon.”—Bustle

16. The Heart Goes Last

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Sep 29, 2015
Number of Pages: 320
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Margaret Atwood puts the human heart to the ultimate test in an utterly brilliant new novel that is as visionary as The Handmaid’s Tale and as richly imagined as The Blind Assassin. Stan and Charmaine are a married couple trying to stay afloat in the midst of an economic and social collapse. Job loss has forced them to live in their car, leaving them vulnerable to roving gangs. They desperately need to turn their situation around—and fast. The Positron Project in the town of Consilience seems to be the answer to their prayers. No one is unemployed and everyone gets a comfortable, clean house to live in . . . for six months out of the year. On alternating months, residents of Consilience must leave their homes and function as inmates in the Positron prison system. Once their month of service in the prison is completed, they can return to their “civilian” homes. At first, this doesn’t seem like too much of a sacrifice to make in order to have a roof over one’s head and food to eat. But when Charmaine becomes romantically involved with the man who lives in their house during the months when she and Stan are in the prison, a series of troubling events unfolds, putting Stan’s life in danger. With each passing day, Positron looks less like a prayer answered and more like a chilling prophecy fulfilled.

17. Dire Cartographies

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Sep 08, 2015
Number of Pages: 32
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In honor of the thirtieth anniversary of The Handmaid’s Tale: Margaret Atwood describes how she came to write her utopian, dystopian works. The word “utopia” comes from Thomas More’s book of the same name—meaning “no place” or “good place,” or both. In “Dire Cartographies,” from the essay collection In Other Worlds, Atwood coins the term “ustopia,” which combines utopia and dystopia, the imagined perfect society and its opposite. Each contains latent versions of the other. Following her intellectual journey and growing familiarity with ustopias fictional and real, from Atlantis to Avatar and Beowulf to Berlin in 1984 (and 1984), Atwood explains how years after abandoning a PhD thesis with chapters on good and bad societies, she produced novel-length dystopias and ustopias of her own. “My rules for The Handmaid’s Tale were simple,” Atwood writes. “I would not put into this book anything that humankind had not already done, somewhere, sometime, or for which it did not already have the tools.” With great wit and erudition, Atwood reveals the history behind her beloved creations.

18. The Stone Mattress

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jun 23, 2015
Number of Pages: 304
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Margaret Atwood returns to short fiction with nine tales of acute psychological insight and turbulent relationships bringing to mind her award-winning 1996 novel, Alias Grace. A recently widowed fantasy writer is guided through a stormy winter evening by the voice of her late husband in “Alphinland,” the first of three loosely linked stories about the romantic geometries of a group of writers and artists. In “The Freeze-Dried Bridegroom,” a man who bids on an auctioned storage space has a surprise. In “Lusus Naturae,” a woman born with a genetic abnormality is mistaken for a vampire. In “Torching the Dusties,” an elderly lady with Charles Bonnet syndrome comes to terms with the little people she keeps seeing, while a newly formed populist group gathers to burn down her retirement residence. And in “Stone Mattress,” a long-ago crime is avenged in the Arctic via a 1.9 billion-year-old stromatolite. In these nine tales, Margaret Atwood is at the top of her darkly humorous and seriously playful game.

19. On Writers and Writing

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 15, 2015
Number of Pages: 224
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What is the role of the writer? Prophet? High Priest of Art? Court Jester? Or witness to the real world? Looking back on her own childhood and the development of her writing career, Margaret Atwood examines the metaphors which writers of fiction and poetry have used to explain – or excuse! – their activities, looking at what costumes they have seen fit to assume, what roles they have chosen to play. In her final chapter she takes up the challenge of the book’s title: if a writer is to be seen as ‘gifted’, who is doing the giving and what are the terms of the gift? Margaret Atwood’s wide and eclectic reference to other writers, living and dead, is balanced by anecdotes from her own experiences as a writer, both in Canada and on the international scene. The lightness of her touch is underlined by a seriousness about the purpose and the pleasures of writing, and by a deep familiarity with the myths and traditions of western literature.

20. Maddaddam

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Aug 12, 2014
Number of Pages: 394
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Toby and Ren return to the MaddAddamite cob house after rescuing Amanda and assuming the duties of the Craker’s religious overseers while Zeb searches for the founder of the pacifist green religion he left years earlier.

21. Bluebeard’s Egg

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 29, 2013
Number of Pages: 281
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With the publication of the best-selling The Handmaid’s Tale in 1986, Margaret Atwood’s place in North American letters was reconfirmed. Poet, short story writer, and novelist, she was acclaimed “one of the most intelligent and talented writers to set herself the task of deciphering life in the late twentieth century.”* With Bluebeard’s Egg, her second short story collection, Atwood covers a dramatic range of storytelling, her scope encompassing the many moods of her characters, from the desolate to the hilarious. The stories are set in the 1940s, 1950s, and 1980s and concern themselves with relationships of various sorts. There is the bond between a political activist and his kidnapped cat, a woman and her dead psychiatrist, a potter and the group of poets who live with her and mythologize her, an artist and the strange men she picks up to use as models. There is a man who finds himself surrounded by women who are literally shrinking, and a woman whose life is dominated by a fear of nuclear warfare; there are telling relationships among parents and children. By turns humorous and warm, stark and frightening, Bluebeard’s Egg explores and illuminates both the outer world in which we all live and the inner world that each of us creates. *Le Anne Schreiber, Vogue

22. The Year Of The Flood

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 2013
Number of Pages: 518
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By the author of The Handmaid’s Tale and Alias Grace The sun brightens in the east, reddening the blue-grey haze that marks the distant ocean. The vultures roosting on the hydro poles fan out their wings to dry them. the air smells faintly of burning. The waterless flood – a man-made plague – has ended the world. But two young women have survived: Ren, a young dancer trapped where she worked, in an upmarket sex club (the cleanest dirty girls in town); and Toby, who watches and waits from her rooftop garden. Is anyone else out there?

23. Speeches for Doctor Frankenstein

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Nov 01, 2012
Number of Pages: 45
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In 1966, before they were international sensations, Margaret Atwood and Charles Pachter teamed up to create Speeches for Doctor Frankenstein — now a unique piece of cultural history and available for the first time as an enhanced eBook for iPad. In this imaginative work, only existing as an artist book of fifteen copies until recently, Charles Pachter set the poetry of Margaret Atwood to his beautiful and whimsical artwork. Produced originally on handmade paper made with materials found around his house, this is a rare piece of art that should be read by anyone interested in the origins of these two great artists. This work is now exclusively available for the iPad as an enhanced eBook, and features an introduction by Margaret Atwood, video interviews with Charles Pachter, and an audio narration of Margaret Atwood reading the poems. When you load this enhanced eBook in iBooks, you will find a speaker icon in the info bar at the top of the screen, which is where you can access the enhanced features of this eBook. For the optimal reading experience, turn on these features by tapping on the speaker, turning on the soundtrack, setting pages to turn automatically and tap “Start Reading.” For a more traditional reading experience, turn these elements off and change the settings to turn the pages manually. This enhanced eBook contains high-resolution images and embedded audio and video. Depending on the speed of your internet connection this book may take up to 25 minutes to download. Rest assured, it is worth the wait!

24. Survival

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jun 20, 2012
Number of Pages: 328
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When first published in 1972, Survival was considered the most startling book ever written about Canadian literature. Since then, it has continued to be read and taught, and it continues to shape the way Canadians look at themselves. Distinguished, provocative, and written in effervescent, compulsively readable prose, Survival is simultaneously a book of criticism, a manifesto, and a collection of personal and subversive remarks. Margaret Atwood begins by asking: “What have been the central preoccupations of our poetry and fiction?” Her answer is “survival and victims.” Atwood applies this thesis in twelve brilliant, witty, and impassioned chapters; from Moodie to MacLennan to Blais, from Pratt to Purdy to Gibson, she lights up familiar books in wholly new perspectives. This new edition features a foreword by the author.

25. Dancing Girls

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Mar 27, 2012
Number of Pages: 256
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This splendid volume of short fiction testifies to Margaret Atwood’s startlingly original voice, full of a rare intensity and exceptional intelligence. Her men and women still miscommunicate, still remain separate in different rooms, different houses, or even different worlds. With brilliant flashes of fantasy, humor, and unexpected violence, the stories reveal the complexities of human relationships and bring to life characters who touch us deeply, evoking terror and laughter, compassion and recognition–and dramatically demonstrate why Margaret Atwood is one of the most important writers in English today.

26. The Robber Bride

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jun 08, 2011
Number of Pages: 528
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From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Handmaid’s Tale One of Margaret Atwood’s most unforgettable characters lurks at the center of this intricate novel like a spider in a web. The glamorous, irresistible, unscrupulous Zenia is nothing less than a fairy-tale villain in the memories of her former friends. Roz, Charis, and Tony—university classmates decades ago—were reunited at Zenia’s funeral and have met monthly for lunch ever since, obsessively retracing the destructive swath she once cut through their lives. A brilliantly inventive fabulist, Zenia had a talent for exploiting her friends’ weaknesses, wielding intimacy as a weapon and cheating them of money, time, sympathy, and men. But one day, five years after her funeral, they are shocked to catch sight of Zenia: even her death appears to have been yet another fiction. As the three women plot to confront their larger-than-life nemesis, Atwood proves herself a gleefully acute observer of the treacherous shoals of friendship, trust, desire, and power.

27. In Other Worlds

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 2011
Number of Pages: 255
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A series of essays explores essential truths about the modern world and the author’s personal relationship with the science fiction genre, in a volume complemented by key reviews and her three unpublished Ellmann Lectures.

28. Alias Grace

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Dec 10, 2010
Number of Pages: 592
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In this astonishing tour de force, Margaret Atwood takes the reader back in time and into the life and mind of one of the most enigmatic and notorious women of the nineteenth century. In 1843, at the age of sixteen, servant girl Grace Marks was convicted for her part in the vicious murders of her employer and his mistress. Some believe Grace is innocent; others think her evil or insane. Grace herself claims to have no memory of the murders. As Dr. Simon Jordan – an expert in the burgeoning field of mental illness – tries to unlock her memory, what will he find? Was Grace a femme fatale – or a weak and unwilling victim of circumstances? Taut and compelling, penetrating and wise, Alias Grace is a beautifully crafted work of the imagination that vividly evokes time and place. The novel and its characters will continue to haunt the reader long after the final page.

29. Good Bones

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jul 01, 2010
Number of Pages: 160
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A treasure trove of collected works from the legendary author of The Handmaid’s Tale and Alias Grace Queen Gertrude gives Hamlet a piece of her mind. An ugly sister and a wicked stepmother put in a good word for themselves. A reincarnated bat explains how Bram Stoker got Dracula hopelessly wrong. Bones and Murder is a bewitching cocktail of prose and poetry, fiction and fairytales, as well as some of Atwood’s own illustrations. It’s pure distilled Atwood: deliciously strong and bittersweet. ‘A marvellous miniature sample case of Atwood’s sensuous and sardonic talents’ Times Literary Supplement

30. The Penelopiad

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: May 16, 2010
Number of Pages: 224
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In a splendid contemporary twist, Margaret Atwood tells Penelope’s story. In Homer’s account, Penelope is the constant wife. It is she who rules Odysseus’s kingdom of Ithaca during his twenty-year absence at the Trojan War. She raises their wayward son and fends off over a hundred insistent suitors. When Odysseus finally returns-having vanquished monsters, slept with goddesses and endured many other well-documented hardships-he kills the suitors and also, curiously, twelve of Penelope’s maids. Margaret Atwood tells the story through Penelope and her twelve hanged maids, asking: ‘What led to the hanging of the maids, and what was Penelope really up to?’ It’s a dazzling, playful retelling, as wise and compassionate as it is haunting; as wildly entertaining as it is disturbing. The Myths series gathers a diverse group of the finest writers of our time to provide a contemporary take on our most enduring myths. ‘The Penelopiad shows Atwood making off with an especially well-guarded cultural treasure-and making it new, as she always does.’ Independent Weekly

31. Murder in the Dark

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 2010
Number of Pages: 128
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These short fictions and prose poems are beautifully bizarre: bread can no longer be thought of as wholesome comforting loaves; the pretensions of the male chef are subjected to a loght roasting; a poisonous brew is concocted by cynical five year olds; and knowing when to stop is of deadly importance in a game of Murder in the Dark. * ‘Direct, unpretentious, humorous’ SUNDAY TIMES

32. Curious Pursuits

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Oct 01, 2009
Number of Pages: 432
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By the author of The Handmaid’s Tale and Alias Grace Curious Pursuits is a collection of personal essays, book reviews and articles from the fierce, ingenious mind of Margaret Atwood, ranging from 1970 to the present. Atwood remembers moving to London as a starry-eyed teenager in 1964 and her first attempts at gardening; she discusses feminist utopias in fiction, and writes moving odes on beloved classics like Anne of Green Gables. Personal life and fiction are shelved side by side in this revealing, insightful collection of Atwood’s non-fiction writing. PRAISE FOR Curious Pursuits ‘A goldmine’ Sunday Times ‘Reminds one that Atwood is a superbly funny (as well as serious) writer; her wit is winningly relaxed and genial as well as sharp’ Spectator ‘The glimpses into the writing process and her reflections on identity will delight fans of her novels, who will also recognise flashes of her mordant wit’ Times

33. Strange Things

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Oct 01, 2009
Number of Pages: 160
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Margaret Atwood’s witty and informative book focuses on the imaginative mystique of the wilderness of the Canadian North. She discusses the ‘Grey Owl Syndrome’ of white writers going native; the folklore arising from the mysterious– and disastrous — Franklin expedition of the nineteenth century; the myth of the dreaded snow monster, the Wendigo; the relations between nature writing and new forms of Gothic; and how a fresh generation of women writers in Canada have adapted the imagery of the Canadian North for the exploration of contemporary themes of gender, the family and sexuality. Writers discussed include Robert Service, Robertson Davies, Alice Munro, E.J. Pratt, Marian Engel, Margaret Laurence, and Gwendolyn MacEwan. This superbly written and compelling portrait of the mysterious North is at once a fascinating insight into the Canadian imagination, and an exciting new work from an outstanding literary presence.

34. Moral Disorder

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Mar 31, 2009
Number of Pages: 240
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Atwood triumphs with these dazzling, personal stories in her first collection since Wilderness Tips. In these ten interrelated stories Atwood traces the course of a life and also the lives intertwined with it, while evoking the drama and the humour that colour common experiences — the birth of a baby, divorce and remarriage, old age and death. With settings ranging from Toronto, northern Quebec, and rural Ontario, the stories begin in the present, as a couple no longer young situate themselves in a larger world no longer safe. Then the narrative goes back in time to the forties and moves chronologically forward toward the present. In “The Art of Cooking and Serving,” the twelve-year-old narrator does her best to accommodate the arrival of a baby sister. After she boldly declares her independence, we follow the narrator into young adulthood and then through a complex relationship. In “The Entities,” the story of two women haunted by the past unfolds. The magnificent last two stories reveal the heartbreaking old age of parents but circle back again to childhood, to complete the cycle. By turns funny, lyrical, incisive, tragic, earthy, shocking, and deeply personal, Moral Disorder displays Atwood’s celebrated storytelling gifts and unmistakable style to their best advantage. This is vintage Atwood, writing at the height of her powers. From the Hardcover edition.

35. Payback

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 2008
Number of Pages: 244
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Explores debt as a central historical component of religion, literature, and societal structure, while examining the idea of humanity’s debt to the natural world.

36. The Tent

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 2007
Number of Pages: 158
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A collection of writings encompasses a range of literary forms, including parodies, playlets, monologues, and meditations, dealing with such topics as the relationships between men and women and the fleeting thrills of youth and fame.

37. The Door

by: Margaret AtwoodMargaret Eleanor Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 2007
Number of Pages: 120
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A collection of poems that gravitate between the personal and political, the lyrical and meditative, and the ironic and prophetic, exploring such themes as the writing of poetry, the awareness of mortality, and the passage of time.

38. Writing with Intent

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jul 18, 2006
Number of Pages: 448
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The first collection of nonfiction work by the author in more than two decades features fifty-seven essays and reviews on a wide range of topics, including John Updike, Toni Morrison, grunge, September 11th, and Gabriel Garca Mrquez, among others. Reprint.

39. Up in the Tree

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 2006
Number of Pages: 32
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Two children who live in a tree don’t know what to do when beavers take their ladder, and after rescue comes at the hands of a friend, they find a way to return without worry.

40. Waltzing Again

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 2006
Number of Pages: 280
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“I don’t mind being ‘interviewed’ any more than I mind Viennese waltzingthat is, my response will depend on the agility and grace and attitude and intelligence of the other person. Some do it well, some clumsily, some step on your toes by accident, and some aim for them.”Margaret Atwood This gathering of 21 interviews with Margaret Atwood covers a broad spectrum of topics. Beginning with Graeme Gibson’s “Dissecting the Way a Writer Works” (1972), the conversations provide a forum for Atwood to talk about her own work, her career as a writer, feminism, and Canadian cultural nationalism, and to refute the autobiographical fallacy. These conversations offer what Earl Ingersoll calls “a kind of ‘biography’ of Margaret Atwoodthe only kind of biography she is likely to sanction.” Enlivened by Atwood’s unfailing sense of humor, the interviews present an invaluable view of a distinguished contemporary writer at work. From the Interviews: “Let’s not pretend that the interview will necessarily result in any absolute and blinding revelations. Interviews too are an art form; that is to say, they indulge in the science of illusion.” “I don’t think you ever know how to write a book. You never know ahead of time. You start every time at zero. A former success doesn’t mean that you’re not going to make the most colossal failure the next time.”

41. Polonia

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 2006
Number of Pages: 18
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42. Oryx And Crake

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Mar 30, 2004
Number of Pages: 400
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From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Handmaid’s Tale Oryx and Crake is at once an unforgettable love story and a compelling vision of the future. Snowman, known as Jimmy before mankind was overwhelmed by a plague, is struggling to survive in a world where he may be the last human, and mourning the loss of his best friend, Crake, and the beautiful and elusive Oryx whom they both loved. In search of answers, Snowman embarks on a journey–with the help of the green-eyed Children of Crake–through the lush wilderness that was so recently a great city, until powerful corporations took mankind on an uncontrolled genetic engineering ride. Margaret Atwood projects us into a near future that is both all too familiar and beyond our imagining.

43. Oryx y Crake

by: Margaret AtwoodJuanjo Estrella
Release date: Jan 01, 2004
Number of Pages: 422
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44. Rude Ramsey and the Roaring Radishes

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 2003
Number of Pages: 29
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In Rude Ramsey and the Roaring Radishes, bestselling author Margaret Atwood offers a delightfully ridiculous tale that explores the virtues of resisting restrictions. Rude Ramsey has reached the end of his rope! Sick of dining on rock-hard rice, rubbery ribs, wrinkled ravioli and raw rhinoceros, Ramsey and Ralph (the red-nosed rat) resolve to leave their rectangular residence on a quest for a more refreshing repast. Along the way, they encounter the raven-haired Rillah, a romantic rectory, and a patch of roaring radishes. Together, Ramsey, Ralph, and Rillah manage to reveal that, sometimes, the grass truly is greener on the other side of the rampart. With Atwoodâs rollicking text, accompanied by Dusan Petricicâs hilarious and insightful illustrations, Rude Ramsey and the Roaring Radishes is a rare and rewarding treat for readers of all ages.

45. Negotiating with the Dead

by: Margaret AtwoodMargaret Eleanor Atwood
Release date: Mar 06, 2002
Number of Pages: 219
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The author of The Handmaid’s Tale discusses the writing life and the role of the writer in society, making reference to many other writers, alive and dead, to make her case.

46. Story of a Nation

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 2002
Number of Pages: 304
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Inspired by history,Story of a Nationis a beautifully illustrated collection of original stories from some of Canada’s most celebrated and best-loved authors. Twelve of the country’s finest writers, including Margaret Atwood, Roch Carrier, Timothy Findley, Antonine Maillet, Alberto Manguel and Michael Turner, when presented with the question, What are the great events in Canadian history? responded by travelling into the past to discover the moments, both familiar and unexpected, that shaped our nation. Drawing on their skills as master storytellers, the contributors to this collection offer wonderfully imaginative accounts of what it’s like to make history. Margaret Atwood casts her eye back to 1759 and brilliantly captures the journal entries of a frightened French woman, trapped in Québec City as the English forces attack. In “The First of July,” David Macfarlane’s youthful narrator loses himself in the papers of an elderly neighbour, and through the records of her past, experiences the heartbreaking, stunting loss of war. In Thomas King’s hilarious story, “Where the Borg Are,” a young boy named Milton Friendlybear offers a Star Trekkian reinterpretation of the Indian Act, linking its significance to the fate of the universe. And revisiting an occasion of huge national pride, Michelle Berry tells the story of a four-year-old girl caught up in the excitement of the 1972 Summit Series, hopeful that the passion of hockey will hold her crumbling family together. Each of these magical stories is further brought to life by an accompanying visual narrative. Vividly illustrating the joy, sorrow, anger and passion of more than two centuries of our history, here are fifty unforgettable images: the Belgian Queen, a seductive reminder that the Klondike of Roch Carrier’s story was anything but a purely masculine domain; Kurt Meyer, the SS officer who represented evil in the childhood of John Ralston Saul and of many other children whose fathers landed on Juno beach in June 1944; and Viola Desmond at the Hi-Hat Club, whose glamour and elegance contrasted starkly with the small-minded racism so powerfully chronicled by Dionne Brand. With a preface by Rudyard Griffiths, executive director of The Dominion Institute, and introduced by distinguished historian Christopher Moore,Story of a Nationis a moving celebration of Canada’s extraordinary history and our exceptional writers.

47. The Blind Assassin: A Novel

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 2000
Number of Pages: 521
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Iris describes the 1945 death of her sister, who drives her car off a bridge, followed, two years later, by the death of her husband, in a story that features a novel-within-a-novel about two unnamed lovers who meet in a dark backstreet room.

48. Second Words

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 2000
Number of Pages: 444
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Fifty of Margaret Atwood’s finest essays and reviews from 1960 to 1982 are included in this collection of her key critical writings. Wit and originality infuse discussions of the writing process, literary life, and such literary figures as Adrienne Rich, Northrop Frye, Anne Sexton, and E. L. Doctorow. Atwood’s perspectives on Canadian nationalism and the American dream emerge, as do her controversial attitudes about feminism, sexism, and contemporary North American life. This largest collection of her critical prose showcases the human insight and sharp intellect that has distinguished Atwood as one of the most compelling writers of the 21st century.

49. The Circle Game

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jun 01, 1998
Number of Pages: 96
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The appearance of Margaret Atwood’s first major collection of poetry marked the beginning of a truly outstanding career in Canadian and international letters. The voice in these poems is as witty, vulnerable, direct, and incisive as we’ve come to know in later works, such as Power Politics, Bodily Harm, and Alias Grace. Atwood writes compassionately about the risks of love in a technological age, and the quest for identity in a universe that cannot quite be trusted. Containing many of Atwood’s best and most famous poems, The Circle Game won the 1966 Governor General’s Award for Poetry and rapidly attained an international reputation as a classic of modern poetry. This beautiful edition of The Circle Game contains the complete collection, with an introduction by Sherrill E. Grace of the University of British Columbia.

50. Surfacing

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 1998
Number of Pages: 199
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A woman searching for her missing father travels with her lover and another couple to a remote island in northern Quebec, where they encounter violence and death

51. Life Before Man

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 1998
Number of Pages: 361
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Imprisoned by walls of their own construction, here are three people, each in midlife, in midcrisis, forced to make choices—after the rules have changed. Elizabeth, with her controlled sensuality, her suppressed rage, is married to the wrong man. She has just lost her latest lover to suicide. Nate, her gentle, indecisive husband, is planning to leave her for Lesje, a perennial innocent who prefers dinosaurs to men. Hanging over them all is the ghost of Elizabeth’s dead lover…and the dizzying threat of three lives careening inevitably toward the same climax.

52. Cat’s Eye

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 1998
Number of Pages: 477
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Years after painter Elaine Risley flees Toronto for Vancouver, she returns to search for long-missing parts of her life and pursue the elusive Cordelia, her best friend and sometimes enemy

53. Wilderness Tips

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 1998
Number of Pages: 228
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Some writers have moments when they change the way we look at ourselves and the world, but Margaret Atwood has them all the time. In this new work, she tells tales that take the reader to familiar, strange, and secret places of the imagination, with widely ranging settings for thefying stories. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.

54. Lady Oracle

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 1998
Number of Pages: 356
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A sardonic novel follows the bored wife of an anti-nuclear activist on a fantastic adventure from Canada to Italy, involving literary fame, a blackmailing reporter, menacing plots, passionate trysts, and life in death. Reissue.

55. Two Solicitudes

by: Margaret AtwoodVictor Lévy Beaulieu
Release date: Jan 01, 1998
Number of Pages: 276
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In March 1995, Victor-Levy Beaulieu, the well-known French-Canadian novelist and man of letters, spent a week in Toronto, staying with Margaret Atwood. That week in Toronto was matched by a return engagement in May 1995, when Margaret Atwood visited Victor-Levy Beaulieu’s country home near Trois-Pistoles, Quebec. There, over ten days, they discussed many topics of mutual interest that underlie literature: the importance of childhood, of myth, of belonging to territory, the real versus the imaginary world, power and the lack of it, and their own works.

56. A Second Skin

by: Kirsty DunseathMargaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 1998
Number of Pages: 159
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In A Second Skin, top contemporary writers explore the significance of clothes which have marked a particular point in their lives, touching on themes such as identity, memory, family, sexulaity, rebellion, and tradition. From Joan Smith’s rumination on underewar and sexual politics to Helen Dunmore’s sumptuous description of her mother’s red velvet dress, this varied and resonant collection examines the place clothes hold in our lives.

57. Eating Fire

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 1998
Number of Pages: 368
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The evolution of Margaret Atwood’s poetry illuminates one of our major literary talents. Here, as in her novels, is intensity combined with sardonic detachment, and in these early poems her genius for a level stare at the ordinary is wonderfully apparent. Just as startling is her ability to contrast the everyday with the terrifying: ‘Each time I hit a key/ on my electric typewriter/ speaking of peaceful trees/ another village explodes.’ Her poetic voice is crystal clear, insistent, unmistakably her own. Through bus trips and postcards, wilderness and trivia, she reflects the passion and energy of a writer intensely engaged with her craft and the world. Two former collections, Poems 1965 – 1975 and Poems 1976 – 1986, are presented together with her latest collection, Morning in the Burned House, in this omnibus that represents the development of a major poet.

58. Power Politics

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jun 01, 1996
Number of Pages: 80
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A groundbreaking meditation on sexual politics, love, and human tenacity from the world-renowned pioneer of feminist writing and prophetic author of The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood. When it first appeared in 1971, Margaret Atwood’s Power Politics startled readers with its vital dance of woman and man. It still startles today, and is just as iconoclastic as ever. These poems occupy all at once the intimate, the political, and the mythic. Here Atwood makes us realize that we may think our own personal dichotomies are unique, but really they are multiple, universal. Clear, direct, wry, and unrelenting — Atwood’s poetic powers are honed to perfection in this seminal work from her early career.

59. Bodily Harm

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 1996
Number of Pages: 291
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A powerful and brilliantly crafted novel, Bodily Harm is the story of Rennie Wilford, a young journalist whose life has begun to shatter around the edges. Rennie flies to the Caribbean to recuperate, and on the tiny island of St. Antoine, she is confronted by a world where her rules for survival no longer apply. By turns comic, satiric, relentless, and terrifying, Margaret Atwood’s Bodily Harm is ultimately an exploration of the lust for power, both sexual and political, and the need for compassion that goes beyond what we ordinarily mean by love”.The acerbic wit that is an Atwood trademark…political insights…comedy and pathos, and in the end, tragedy”. — Chicago Sun-TimesHumor and satire, thoughtfulness, and lots of action make this a jam-packed novel”. — The Washington Post”Romance and adventure by a female Graham Greene at his peak”. — Marilyn French, author of The Women’s Room”This is a story about one of today’s women…Bodily Harm is strong stuff, and the writing is nearly flawless”. — People

60. Morning in the Burned House

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 1995
Number of Pages: 148
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A collection of intimate reflections on such diverse subjects as classical history, popular mythology, love, and the fragility of nature

61. Princess Prunella and the Purple Peanut

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 1995
Number of Pages: 32
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Presenting Princess Prunella. Proud, prissy, and pretty, and unhappily very spoiled, she lives in a pink palace with her pinheaded parents, her three plump pussycats, and her prize puppy dog, Pug. Her passion? Her very own person. Her aspiration? To marry a pinheaded prince with piles of pin money, who will praise and pamper her. From Margaret Atwood–the novelist, poet, short story writer and author of such contemporary bestsellers as” The Handmaid’s Tale” and “The Robber Bride”–comes a modern fairy tale with a classic message. Illustrated with elegant humor by Maryann Kovalski, “Princess Prunella and the Purple Peanut “revels in the smart-alecky humor of its impertinent heroine and an alliteration of p’s that gives the story a tongue-twisting energy with surprises at every turn. Children, and adults who love reading to children, will love reading princess prunella in the same way that they love reading Dr. Suess for the sheer fun of the language. But there’s something more, too, as a born storyteller creates, with the mere choice of a word, an indelibly lively portrait of a spoiled little girl who is about to get her much-deserved comeuppance. Selection of Book-of-the-Month Club. 53,000 copies in print.

62. The Edible Woman

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 1991
Number of Pages: 308
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Ever since her engagement, the strangest thing has been happening to Marian McAlpin: she can’t eat. First meat. Then eggs, vegetables, cake, pumpkin seeds–everything! Worse yet, she has the crazy feeling that she’s being eaten. Marian ought to feel consumed with passion, but she really just feels…consumed. A brilliant and powerful work rich in irony and metaphor, “The Edible Woman” is an unforgettable masterpiece by a true master of contemporary literary fiction.

63. Margaret Atwood

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 1988
Number of Pages: 269
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A prolific writer and versatile social critic, Canadian novelist and poet Margaret Atwood has recently published Bluebeard’s Egg (short stories), Interlunar (poetry), and The Handmaid’s Tale a critically acclaimed best-selling novel. This international collection of essays evaluates the complete body of her work—both the acclaimed fiction and the innovative poetry. The critics represented here—American, Australian, and Canadian—address Atwood’s handling of such themes as feminism, ecology, the gothic novel, and the political relationship between Canada and the United States. The essays on Atwood’s novels introduce the general reader to her development as a writer, as she matures from a basically subjective, poetic vision, seen in Surfacing and The Edible Woman, to an increasingly engaged, political stance, exemplified by The Handmaid’s Tale. Other essays examine Atwood’s poetry, from her transformation of the Homeric model to her criticisms of the United States’ relationship with Canada. The last two critical essays offer a unique view of Atwood through an investigation of her use of the concept of shamanism and through a presentation of eight of her vivid watercolors. The volume ends with Atwood presenting her own views in an interview with Jan Garden Castro and in a conversation between Atwood and students at the University of Tampa, Florida.

64. Interlunar

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 1988
Number of Pages: 103
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65. Selected Poems II

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 1987
Number of Pages: 147
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This collection of seventy-three poems includes poems culled from “Two Headed Poems,” “True Stories,” and “Interlunar,” as well as seventeen poems not previously published in America in book form

66. Selected Poems, 1965-1975

by: Margaret Atwood
Release date: Jan 01, 1987
Number of Pages: 240
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Poems deal with death, self-image, disasters, politics, children, evolution, history, the news, language, dreams, animals, and love.

67. True Stories

by: Margaret Atwood
Number of Pages: 112
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This book is Margaret Atwood’s ninth collection of poems.

68. You are Happy

by: Margaret Atwood
Number of Pages: 96
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69. The Journals of Susanna Moodie

by: Margaret Atwood
Number of Pages: 76
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This cycle of poems is perhaps the most memorable evocation in modern Canadian literature of the myth of the wilderness, the immigrant experience, and the alienating and schizophrenic effects of the colonial mentality. Since it was first published in 1970 it has not only acquired the stature of a classic but, reprinted many times, become the best-known extended work in Canadian poetry. Susanna Moodie (1805-85) emigrated from England in 1832 to Upper Canada, where she settled on a farm with her husband. She wrote several books in Canada, notably Roughing It in the Bush, a famous account of pioneering that is still widely read. In poems about the arrival and the Moodies’ seven years in the bush, which were followed by a more civilized ilfe in Belleville, and about Mrs Moodie in old age and then after death – in the present, when she observes the twentieth century destroying her past and its meaning – Margaret Atwood has created haunting meditations on an English gentlewoman’s confrontation with the wilderness, and compelling variations on the themes of dislocation and alienation, nature and civilization. The poems are supplemented by Margaret Atwood’s collages and an ‘Afterword’ in which the poet says: ‘We are all imigrants to this place even if we were born here….’

Last updated on Friday, September 23, 2022