Imagine by Jonah Lehrer

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Imagine

by: Jonah Lehrer
Release date: Jan 01, 2012
Number of Pages: 279
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“New York Times” bestselling author Jonah Lehrer introduces us to musicians, graphic artists, poets, and bartenders to show us how we can use science to be more imaginative and make our cities, our companies, and our culture more creative.

More books by Jonah Lehrer

1. Mystery

by: Jonah Lehrer
Release date: Aug 17, 2021
Number of Pages: 256
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Drawing on the fields of psychology, neuroscience and anthropology, a New York Times best-selling author unlocks the secrets of mystery’s allure, shedding new light on everything from the formulas of our favorite detective shows to the calculated risks of the stock market.

2. A Book About Love

by: Jonah Lehrer
Release date: Jul 25, 2017
Number of Pages: 304
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Weaving together scientific studies from clinical psychologists, longitudinal studies of health and happiness, historical accounts and literary depictions, child-rearing manuals, and the language of online dating sites, Jonah Lehrer’s A Book About Love plumbs the most mysterious, most formative, most important impulse governing our lives. Love confuses and compels us–and it can destroy and define us. It has inspired our greatest poetry, defined our societies and our beliefs, and governs our biology. From the way infants attach to their parents, to the way we fall in love with another person, to the way some find a love for God or their pets, to the way we remember and mourn love after it ends, this book focuses on research that attempts, even in glancing ways, to deal with the long-term and the everyday. The most dangerous myth of love is that it’s easy, that we fall into the feeling and then the feeling takes care of itself. While we can easily measure the dopamine that causes the initial feelings of “falling” in love, the partnerships and devotions that last decades or longer remain a mystery. This book is about that mystery. Love, Lehrer argues, is not built solely on overwhelming passion, but, fascinatingly, on a set of skills to be cultivated over a lifetime.

3. The Smarter Screen

by: Shlomo BenartziJonah Lehrer
Release date: Feb 07, 2017
Number of Pages: 256
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“A leading behavioral economist shows how businesses can improve consumer thinking and decision-making on screens,”–NoveList.

4. The Decisive Moment

by: Jonah Lehrer
Release date: Jan 01, 2010
Number of Pages: 294
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Since Plato, philosophers have described the decision-making process as either rational or emotional: we carefully deliberate or we ‘blink’ and go with our gut. But as scientists break open the mind’s black box with the latest tools of neuroscience, they’re discovering this is not how the mind works. Our best decisions are a finely tuned blend of both feeling and reason – and the precise mix depends on the situation. When buying a house, for example, it’s best to let our unconscious mull over the many variables. But when we’re picking stocks and shares, intuition often leads us astray. The trick is to determine when to lean on which part of the brain, and to do this, we need to think harder (and smarter) about how we think. In The Decisive Moment, Jonah Lehrer arms us with the tools we need, drawing on cutting-edge research by Daniel Kahneman, Colin Camerer and others, as well as the world’s most interesting ‘deciders’ – from airline pilots, world-famous sportsmen and hedge fund investors to serial killers, politicians and poker players. Lehrer answers two questions that are of interest to just about anyone, from CEOs to firefighters: How does the human mind make decisions? And how can we use that knowledge to make better decisions?

5. How We Decide

by: Jonah Lehrer
Release date: Jan 01, 2009
Number of Pages: 302
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Offers a fascinating look at the new science of decision-making–and how it can help us make better choices.

6. Proust Was A Neuroscientist

by: Jonah Lehrer
Release date: Sep 01, 2008
Number of Pages: 256
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The New York Times–bestselling author provides an “entertaining” look at how artists enlighten us about the workings of the brain (New York magazine). In this book, the author of How We Decide and Imagine: How Creativity Works “writes skillfully and coherently about both art and science”—and about the connections between the two (Entertainment Weekly). In this technology-driven age, it’s tempting to believe that science can solve every mystery. After all, it’s cured countless diseases and sent humans into space. But as Jonah Lehrer explains, science is not the only path to knowledge. In fact, when it comes to understanding the brain, art got there first. Taking a group of artists—a painter, a poet, a chef, a composer, and a handful of novelists—Lehrer shows how each one discovered an essential truth about the mind that science is only now rediscovering. We learn, for example, how Proust first revealed the fallibility of memory; how George Eliot discovered the brain’s malleability; how the French chef Escoffier discovered umami (the fifth taste); how Cézanne worked out the subtleties of vision; and how Gertrude Stein exposed the deep structure of language—a full half-century before the work of Noam Chomsky and other linguists. More broadly, Lehrer shows that there’s a cost to reducing everything to atoms and acronyms and genes. Measurement is not the same as understanding, and art knows this better than science does. An ingenious blend of biography, criticism, and first-rate science writing, Proust Was a Neuroscientist urges science and art to listen more closely to each other, for willing minds can combine the best of both to brilliant effect. “His book marks the arrival of an important new thinker . . . Wise and fresh.” —Los Angeles Times

Last updated on Tuesday, November 16, 2021